April 12, 2016

Artist of the Week: Emily Kame Kngwarreye



Emily Kame Kngwarreye painting
Yam Dreaming-Awelye, 1995, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 36 inches




I just saw some pictures of this artist's work on pinterest and needed to share..
Emily Kame Kngwarreye was an Australian Aboriginal artist 1910-1996.
She had a few different styles of painting but I was particularly drawn to these (no surprise there!)
Some online sources were difficult to decipher so hopefully I've gotten all the info. correct on these images. Enjoy!

Emily Kame Kngwarreye painting
Kame Colour, 1995, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 36 inches

Emily Kame Kngwarreye painting
Wild Yam Dreaming, 1995, acrylic on canvas, 47 x 35 inches

Emily Kame Kngwarreye painting
Yam Awelye- Body Paint, 1996, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 36 inches
Emily Kame Kngwarreye painting
Awelye, 1995, acrylic on canvas, 48 x 85 inches
Emily Kame Kngwarreye painting
Kame Awelye, 1995, acrylic on canvas, 89.5 x 58.5 inches


Emily Kame Kngwarreye painting
Bush Yam Dreaming, 1994, acrylic on canvas, 54 x 104 inches
Emily Kame Kngwarreye painting
Kame Colour II, 1995, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 36 inches
Emily Kame Kngwarreye painting
Untitled, acrylic on canvas, 59 x 48 inches
Emily Kame Kngwarreye painting
Anooralya Awelye, 1995, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 36 inches

Emily Kame Kngwarreye painting
Untitled, 1996, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 36 inches



Emily Kame Kngwarreye painting
Emily Kame Kngwarreye, painting






March 30, 2016

Tropical Inspiration


After a week's vacation spent at the Gulf I'm convinced I belong in the tropics!

It's no joke that even with the worst cold I've had in 3 years, the salty air and hot sun were able to transform misery into... paradise. Lush greens, turquoise blues, cool floury sand and the fiery heat of the sun all played a part. And those twisting, knowing vines and roots on every pointy cactus and palm frond were enough inspiration for a whole new series of paintings.

So much inspiration and good living makes a week away from the studio just about worth it! Sources say the name Palmeri means pilgrim or palm depending on where you look. I'm going with the palm definition. It reminds me of my house growing up that was filled to the brim with plants: ferns, ficus trees, marginata, philodendron, begonias, and of course the giant palm that prominently appeared in the background of every important family photograph.

Although I'd like to plan ten more trips like this, clearly that's not about to happen. Here's what will be happening though: when we move into our new house, our new sun room will be filled with all things tropical, not least of all a giant palm tree.




March 8, 2016

Artist of the week: Jeff Perrott


Jeff Perrott painting
RW1 (CRUX), 2009, oil on canvas, 78 x 56 inches




Jeff Perrott painting
RW5 (PAPILLON), 2010, oil on birch panel, 32 x 44 inches

Jeff Perrott painting
RW8 (COIL), 2010, oil and enamel on birch panel, 28 x 22 inches

Jeff Perrott painting
RW9 (STRUCTURE), 2010, oil and enamel on birch panel, 40 x 30 inches

Jeff Perrott painting
RW14 (CANDYMAN), 2010, oil and enamel on canvas, 96 x 80 inches

Jeff Perrott painting
RW64 (YET), 2010-11, oil, enamel, pencil on canvas, 96 x 84 inches

Jeff Perrott painting
RW67 (SEMI-AUTONOMIC), 2011, oil, enamel, pencil on canvas, 72 x 68 inches

Jeff Perrott painting
RW78 (LONE-WOLF), 2011, oil, enamel, pencil, gesso on canvas, 58 x 44 inches

Jeff Perrott painting
RW181 (HOW MUCH RUNWAY HAVE YOU GOT), 2015, oil on canvas, 96 x 80 inches

Jeff Perrott painting
RW183 (JUNG JUNGLE), 2015, oil on canvas, 42 x 39 inches








Further looking and reading:

Jeff Perrott 
Center Street Studio
Morgan Lehman
Jeff Perrott painting
RW48 (LOSETHEGURU), 2011, oil on canvas, 60 x 72 inches

Jeff Perrott painting
RW13 (FAIR GAME), 2010, oil on canvas, 80 x 96 inches
Jeff Perrott painting
RW12 (MISTER BROWN), 2010, oil and enamel on linen, 66 x 46 inches














February 16, 2016

this week's artist round-up

Lately I've been getting rather caught up in color choices. It's like the more colors I use in my paintings the more I am wishing I didn't have to make that many decisions... So it's no surprise that I inadvertently chose some artists this week who've successfully narrowed down their own color choices:
Amy Feldman
Mary Weatherford
Christopher Wool
Jacqueline Humphries


Jacqueline Humphries painting
Jacqueline Humphries, 41/14, 2014, oil on linen, 114 x 127 inches

Amy Feldman painting
Amy Feldman, Mr. and Mrs., 2012, acrylic on canvas, 75 x 80 inches

Mary Weatherford
Mary Weatherford, Canyon, 2014, flashe and neon on linen, 112 x 99 inches
Christopher Wool
Christopher Wool, Untitled, 2001, silkscreen ink on linen, 90 x 60 inches

Mary Weatherford
Mary Weatherford, From the mountainto the sea, 2014, flashe and neon on linen, 117 x 234 inches

Amy Feldman painting
Amy Feldman, Gut Smut, 2014, acrylic on canvas, 79 x 79 inches

Jacqueline Humphries painting
Jacqueline Humphries, Untitled, 2014, oil on linen, 100 x 111 inches

Mary Weatherford
Mary Weatherford, La Nina, 2014, flashe and neon on linen
Christopher Wool
Christopher Wool, Untitled, 2007, enamel on linen, 120 x 96 inches
Amy Feldman painting
Amy Feldman, Mood Mode, 2013, acrylic on canvas, 80 x 85 inches
Jacqueline Humphries painting
Jacqueline Humphries, Untitled, 2014, oil on linen, 114 x 127 inches

Christopher Wool
Christopher Wool, Untitled, 2006, enamel on linen, 104 x 78 inches
Amy Feldman painting
Amy Feldman, Show and Tell, 2013, acrylic on canvas, 80 x 80 inches
Mary Weatherford
Mary Weatherford, Ruby I, 2012, flashe and neon on linen

Although Mary Weatherford's work I think is all about color, I still wanted to include her here.

Further looking and reading:
Mary Weatherford
Christopher Wool
Jacqueline Humphries
Amy Feldman







February 12, 2016

Artist's Daily Rituals

Here's a great book for artists I recently read that I must share with you,
Daily Rituals: How Artists Work, edited and with text by Mason Currey.

Daily Rituals by Mason Currey
It presents detailed descriptions of the daily routines of 161 artists, mostly in their own words. It includes artists of every genre throughout history including writers, composers, painters, choreographers, playwrights, poets, philosophers, sculptors, filmmakers, and scientists.

I am so fascinated by books like this. I love to hear how other artists spend their days in and out of the studio. With all the vagaries of artist temperaments, and all the disparate ways of getting things done, what amazes me is that in the end I think we are all exactly the same, all fighting with ourselves over one thing or another, and for the same end purpose: creating. So many quirks and peculiar habits: charts and time clocks to track the time, pots of coffee and chocolate and opium and whiskey to keep us up when we should be down and down when we should be up. Rising at 3am or at noon or not sleeping at all, working in pajamas or while lying in bed or at the kitchen table. All leading up to the most important aspect of our lives, the work. I think most artists agree that inspiration is either non-existent or so constant we don't think of it as inspiration at all. The key is getting to work, whether we feel inclined at the moment or not. I love reading about an artist who lived two hundred years ago who went about his day similarly to the way I go about my day. Not to get too overly sentimental (if it's not too late), but I think it's important for artists to feel this connection, like we're continuing something important, something we can't help to begin with.

Willem de Kooning
photo of Willem de Kooning
I was thinking the other day that I can't remember an article I've read about contemporary painting in maybe the last five years that did not mention de Kooning at least 4 times. I wonder how he would feel about that. I used to imagine de Kooning's work ethic the epitome of what an artist's life should look like. Like being in your art studio 12 hours a day seven days a week was the only way to be a real artist. The man never stopped working. After years of struggling with that notion I've finally accepted my own way of doing things, which needless to say is a far cry from someone like Willem de Kooning.


Willem de Kooning
Woman Landscape XII, Willem de Kooning

Everyone needs to find their own way, so if four hours in the studio gets me to the best work I can make, so be it. 

Books like Daily Rituals confirm all my ideas about being an artist. It's wonderfully encouraging to see how other artists have been dealing with all the same issues but in so many different ways for so long...

for like ever.



January 23, 2016

artist of the week: Amy Sillman

Amy Sillman

Amy Sillman
Amy Sillman, C, 2007, oil on canvas, 45 x 39 inches

Amy Sillman
Amy Sillman, Fast painting #1, 2013-15, oil on canvas, 75 x 66 inches

Amy Sillman
Amy Sillman, Mother, 2013-14,  oil on canvas, 92 × 84 inches

Amy Sillman
Amy Sillman, Untitled, 2012, oil on canvas, 52 x 49 inches

Amy Sillman
Amy Sillman, Untitled, 2013, oil on canvas, 49 x 51 inches

Amy Sillman
Amy Sillman, Untitled, 2013, oil on canvas, 75 x 66 inches

Amy Sillman
Amy Sillman, Untitled (window), 2009, oil on canvas, 51 x 43 inches


Another abstract artist to add to my list which so far has included: Paul Behnke, Eric Sall, Cordy Ryman, and Jason Karolak. If this were a group show I'd also have to include Mary Heilmann, Jack Whitten and Thomas Nozkowski to round off a bit of the old and the new.

Mary Heilmann
Mary Heilmann, 311 Castro Street, 2001, oil on canvas, 54 x 36 inches
Mary Heilmann
Mary Heilmann, Neo Noir, 1998, oil on canvas, 75 x 60 inches
Mary Heilmann
Mary Heilmann, Psychedelic Serape #4, 1982, watercolor on paper, 30 x 22 inches
Mary Heilmann
Mary Heilmann, Surfing on acid, 2005, oil on canvas, 60 x 48 inches
Thomas Nozkowski
Thomas Nozkowski, Untitled (9-9), 2012, oil on linen on panel, 22 x 28 inches

Thomas Nozkowski
Thomas Nozkowski, Untitled (8-128), 2010, oil on linen on panel, 22 x 28 inches
Thomas Nozkowski
Thomas Nozkowski, Untitled (9-2), 2011, oil on linen on panel, 22 x 28 inches
Thomas Nozkowski
Thomas Nozkowski, Untitled (9-10), 2012, oil on linen on panel, 22 x 28 inches

Stanley Whitney
Stanley Whitney, Aura of the Sand Fall, 2014, oil on linen, 48 x 48 inches
Stanley Whitney
Stanley Whitney, Dance the Orange, 2013, oil on linen, 48 x 48 inches


These are all paintings that I absolutely love but could never make myself, and I absolutely love them because I could never make them. I don't do geometry. But what I love and find affinity with is the hand drawn human element, the imperfect geometry. Not to mention the wonderful surface tension, color and line (of course). It's a juicy, vibrant combination, as Mary Heilmann puts it, of "Albers and deKooning in the same painting." Of all these artists, Amy Sillman clearly references the body more than the others, but that's also why I love her work so much. Her blatant gesture combines figuration and abstraction in all the right ways. In certain pieces I can't help finding an affinity with (my first artist crush) painter Susan Rothenberg. 

Amy Sillman
Amy Sillman, Nut, 2011, oil on canvas, 91 x 84 inches

Amy Sillman
Amy Sillman, Junker, 2009, oil on canvas, 84 x 90 inches

Amy Sillman
Amy Sillman, Ich Auch, 2009, oil on canvas, 90.55 x 84.65 inches

Here is a great interview in BOMB magazine between Amy Sillman and R.H Quaytman where she talks more about the human element in her work.

Further looking and reading:
Sikkema, Jenkins & Co.
Art in America

Susan Rothenberg
Susan Rothenberg, 4 Kinds, 1991, oil on canvas, 52 x 88 inches

So maybe this would be the show...

Cordy Ryman
Thomas Nozkowski

Cordy RymanEric Sall
Thomas Nozkowski
Jason Karolak


Jason Karolak
Paul Behnke
Eric Sall

Paul Behnke
Amy SillmanJason Karolak
Amy SillmanMary Heilmann
Mary HeilmannStanley Whitney