Showing posts with label photography. Show all posts
Showing posts with label photography. Show all posts

October 26, 2016

Ida Applebroog: Artist of the Week


Ida Applebroog artistMarginalia (Crawling Man), 1996, oil on canvas, 32 x 72 inches

Ida Applebroog: One of my favorite artists from what seems like a lifetime ago, when I was all about psychological performative painting. A fascinating artist who got a later start in the artworld, but has managed to successfully sustain it even up until now at age 86, Ida Applebroog is a huge inspiration. This was one of the most difficult artists of the week to post because she has so much work, I couldn't decide which were my favorites!


Ida Applebroog artist
  Modern Olympia (after Manet), 1997-2001, Oil on gampi on canvas, 4 panels, 73 x 148 inches

Ida Applebroog artist   Marginalia (goggles/black face), 1996, Oil on canvas, diptych: 16 x 14 inches and 14 x 18 inches


Ida Applebroog artist

         Marginalia (hand on forehead/squatting), 1996, oil on canvas, each 16 x 16 inches


Ida Applebroog artist

I'm rubber, you're glue, 1993, oil on canvas, 99 x 65 inches

Ida Applebroog artist
Winnie's Pooh, 1993, oil on canvas, 86 x 84 inches


Ida Applebroog artist
K-Mart village I, 1989, oil on canvas, 5 panels, 48 x 32 inches


Ida Applebroog artist
         Emetic Fields, 1989, oil on canvas, 108 x 202 inches


Ida Applebroog artist
Sure I'm sure, 1979, ink and rhoplex on vellum, six panels, 12 x 9 ½ inches each


Ida Applebroog artist
Sure I'm sure and the following two images are part of the provocative series of 10 offset books published and distributed by Applebroog from 1977-1981. She called them "performances" and titled them Dyspepsia Works
"Applebroog produced editions of 400 copies cheaply, and mailed them off to friends or acquaintances, or to artists whose work she admired. Eleanor Antin's postcards, graffiti by Jean-Michel Basquiat or Keith Haring, or Jenny Holzer's sheets of "truisms," pasted on bus stops, alongside notices of yoga lessons, kittens, or second-hand furniture for sale, are other examples of not-for-profit artworks, ingeniously and anonymously distributed, through which, without that having been precisely their intention, the artists all became famous."*
*from Art And Moral Dyspepsia by Arthur C. Danto found in Ida Applebroog: Nothing Personal, Paintings 1987-1997

Ida Applebroog artist

Ida Applebroog artist
  Thank You Very Much, 1982 (detail) ink and rhoplex on vellum, 7 panels, 10 ½ x 9 ½ inches each

Ida Applebroog artist
Tobias, 2005, unique digital photograph with mixed media on gampi paper

Ida Applebroog artist
Good Women (Bettie), digital outtake, 2005
Unique digital photograph with mixed media on gampi paper, 35 x 47 inches

Ida Applebroog artist
Monalisa, 2009, mixed media on canvas, 3 panels, 104 x 77 inches


Here's the article and image that inspired this post. Thanks Hyperallergic!
http://hyperallergic.com/329998/drawing-became-ida-applebroogs-means-communicate-outside-world/
Ida Applebroog artist
Mercy Hospital, 1969/70, drawing on paper


The exhibit Ida Applebroog: Mercy Hospital continues at the Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) Miami through October 30. Call Her Applebroog, a documentary on the artist by her daughter Beth B, will screen at O Cinema on October 29.



Ida Applebroog, Installation view of Past Events, 1982

Creative Time's Projects at the Chamber, Manhattan 1982, was inspired by the dramatic environment of the Chamber of Commerce’s Great Hall, which is decorated with portraits of the great financiers from American history, all of them white. In Applebroog's installation, the artist made the walls “speak,” telling an unpleasant story of patriarchy. She placed a small bronze sculpture of a woman in the midst of the portraits and inserted a speech bubble into her lips that warned: “Gentlemen, America is in Trouble,” to which the portraits replied: “Isn’t Capitalism Working?” or “It’s a Jewish Plot.” The show proved controversial: it was removed twice in one month and eventually moved to a gallery. The artist’s response: “What did they think a woman was going to do in that space?”


Further looking and reading:
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/19/arts/design/shes-her-own-artist-and-a-daughters-muse.html?_r=0http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/19/arts/design/shes-her-own-artist-and-a-daughters-muse.html?_r=0

http://idaapplebroog.com/

http://bombmagazine.org/article/2235/ida-applebroog








August 12, 2013

A Photo Exhibition by Jon Slackman

For the past two weeks my family has been fascinated by a nocturnal visitor we call Lady. Each night she spins her web outside of our kitchen door directly over the glass window pane and each morning she is gone. We've discovered Lady is a Barn spider (Araneus cavaticus) and is the same species as Charlotte from Charlotte's Web, which makes us very happy. She is amazing to watch, swinging from her spidey spokes from one woven glob in the center, then meticulously sewing each strand across the spokes with the precision of an Ultrasonic Singer Sewing Machine. When she's done with the web she looks like she's taking a nice nap at the center of her orb. You would think she'd need one after all that work, but she's actually lying in wait for her dinner. We imagine we're helping by leaving the outside light on to attract the bugs, but she seems to do just fine without us! 

The following images titled "Canopies", are photographs by Jon Slackman taken last fall in our yard probably around the same time Lady was being hatched.























 If you'd like information on purchasing any of the images please contact sammysue222@yahoo.com



July 24, 2013

How to creatively hide the clutter while selling your house

Clutter is a nice word for what it really is.

Between my musician percussionist videographer husband, my 10 year old daughter who plays the cello, the clarinet, and the piano, and me, who has saved a lifetime of artwork, art supplies, and ideas scrawled on the backs of every little thing... there is so much stuff.

The conundrum of showing your house to potential buyers is that there's no where to hide it all. They want to see everything, your closets, cabinets, pantry and storage shed. They even look in your bathtub.

In the two months we've been 'selling' our house I've learned a few tricks. Any place can be a potential hiding place. So far my favorites are:

1)  under the computer desk
2)  behind the bookshelf
3)  in the car
4)  under the bed
5)  inside the hamper

It's no joke. A lovely piece of fabric hanging from a tension rod beneath the desk I'm sitting at nicely hides 3 boxes, a binder, a bag and a large paper cutter. That little space between the bookshelves and the wall perfectly fits two boxes of extra books I have no place for. Under the bed is pretty self explanatory. The car happened to be the perfect location for the


empty plastic bins that I don't need right now but will as soon as someone buys the house. The 100 degree weather this past week has most likely melted some of that pile permanently into the back seat, but, small price to pay. Last but not least, yes, I shoved our clean beach bag and blanket into the hamper the other day after a last minute caller left us little time to get it together.

All this and the so called potential buyer's only comment is that the converted garage still looks too much like a garage. I haven't given up yet. Although we've been throwing stuff out like crazy, for borderline hoarders this could take a while...

Here's an important tip for artists.

If somewhere in the back of your unsuccessful mind you imagined a slew of biographers visiting your grandchildren wanting to see every morsel of art you ever created from kindergarten on, forget it. If you can't bring yourself to throw it out, hire a photographer, or get out your tripod, and photograph every lousy drawing and rolled up painting you have tucked away in every corner of your life, and then Throw It All Out!
The few shots that your biographer is ever going to need or actually use for the book are just not worth taking up all your space for. Nothing you did in college is ever going to resurface. And, as long as you have the photos all is not lost. You can take them out and ponder your artistic journey anytime you like. It's a lot easier than rummaging through 85 scrunched up rolls of unlabeled work from 25 years ago. Trust me, Keep the gems, get rid of the rest.
Just think about how many times you've read, say, a Francis Bacon biography or some other great artist and thought, Damn I'd rather be looking at those ugly paintings he destroyed.

But, I digress. Of the many piles of garbage accumulated in front of my house in the last few weeks, old artwork was just one. Here's some pics of items I photographed before I trashed them back when I was still sentimental... Obviously the bathroom closet was the first to go!