Showing posts with label original art. Show all posts
Showing posts with label original art. Show all posts

March 14, 2018

Abstract Heart



FOCUS: Abstract Heart

Abstract Heart: Passion, emotion, deeply-held beliefs – how do we express and convey these concepts through an abstract vocabulary? Abstract Heart solicits work that speaks from the soul through a personal visual language. ...

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www.woodstockart.org
March 17 – April 29, 2018
Juried by Katie Schmidt Feder
Director Garrison Art Center

EXHIBITING ARTISTS: 
Paulette Esrig, Nils Hill, Henry Klimowicz, 
Jerry Michalak, Samantha Palmeri, Tracy Phillips, Stephen Rose, Barbara Smith, 
Kat Stoutenborough, jd weiss

GALLERY TALK: FRI. MAR 23, 5 PM
RECEPTION: MAR 24, 4-6 PM

I'm pleased to be part of this show opening March 24th in Woodstock, NY. 
I'll have three paintings in it. And how nice they used my image for their advertising!

FOCUS: Abstract Heart




March 17 – April 29, 2018

Gallery Talk: Friday, March 23, 5 PM
Reception: Saturday, March 24, 4 – 6 PMMAIN GALLERY
JUROR: Katie Schmidt Feder, Director Garrison Art Center
AWARDS: Linda Freaney Award $100
Exhibiting Artists:
Paulette Esrig, Nils Hill, Henry Klimowicz,
Jerry Michalak, Samantha Palmeri, Tracy Phillips,
Stephen Rose, Barbara Smith Gioia,
Kat Stoutenborough, and jd weiss
Introduced in 2017, the FOCUS series features the work of ten artists in a theme-based exhibition. Selections are curated by a different juror for each exhibition with each artist represented by multiple examples of their work in service to the particular show’s theme.
Abstract Heart: Passion, emotion, deeply-held beliefs – how do we express and convey these concepts through an abstract vocabulary? Abstract Heart solicits work that speaks from the soul through a personal visual language.

In The Press



February 9, 2018

How to Enjoy Bad TV

Watching bad TV has never been so fun. I've been working on these crumpled tracing paper drawings in the evenings with the television going. Needless to say I watch a lot of Cheers and Frasier reruns. Thinking of a better title for them.........

Samantha Palmeri Contemporary Artist
Samantha Palmeri, detail, Magic II, 2017, magic marker on tracing paper

Samantha Palmeri Contemporary Artist
Samantha Palmeri, Magic I, 2017, magic marker on tracing paper, 19 x 24 inches

Samantha Palmeri Contemporary Artist
Samantha Palmeri, Magic II, 2017, magic marker on tracing paper, 19 x 24 inches
Samantha Palmeri Contemporary Artist
Samantha Palmeri, Magic III, 2017, magic marker on tracing paper, 8.5 x 11.5 inches
Samantha Palmeri Contemporary Artist
Samantha Palmeri, Magic IV, 2018, magic marker on tracing paper, 19 x 24 inches
Samantha Palmeri Contemporary Artist
Samantha Palmeri, detail, Magic IV, 2018, magic marker on tracing paper

Samantha Palmeri Contemporary Artist
Samantha Palmeri, Magic V, 2018, magic marker on tracing paper, 19 x 24 inches
Samantha Palmeri Contemporary Artist
Samantha Palmeri, detail, Magic V, 2018, magic marker on tracing paper
Samantha Palmeri Contemporary Artist
Samantha Palmeri, view of 5 drawings


January 19, 2018

How to stress over grant applications

So far my grant application is looking like this. 

Today I watched NYFA's live seminar to get more info. You could comment online and they would read the comments out loud and answer the questions. Just as she started to answer my question the live feed got disconnected,.... which I took as irony. They came back on in a short bit to answer me fully which was great, but just as I was jotting down the answer, probably on the last sentence she was saying, my computer died..... More irony. 

It's been a crazy week and it can best be summarized by outrageous technical difficulties and customer service from hell. I will not weary you with the details. 

Typing this on my husband's laptop isn't the worst thing in the world, and when January is over, this application will be submitted, along with another one due on the 28th, I will have finished and photographed four new paintings, dropped off work for an upcoming show, the Roaring Twenties Fundraiser I'm hosting will be over, and the early setting up stages for my job as Director of Beacon Open Studios will be fully in place. That is one long sentence. Wish me luck!

Samantha Palmeri Contemporary Artist
Samantha Palmeri, Ladyfingers, 2017, oil on canvas, 40 x 40 inches

Samantha Palmeri Contemporary Artist
Samantha Palmeri, Avoirdupois, 2018, oil on canvas, 40 x 40 inches

Samantha Palmeri Contemporary Artist
Samantha Palmeri, Mattress, 2017, oil on canvas, 60 x 60 inches

Samantha Palmeri Contemporary Artist
Samantha Palmeri, Meadow, 2018, oil on canvas, 36 x 36 inches

Samantha Palmeri Contemporary Artist
Samantha Palmeri, Winter painting I, 2016, oil on canvas, 50 x 54 inches

Samantha Palmeri Contemporary Artist
Samantha Palmeri, Winter painting II, 2016, oil on canvas, 50 x 50 inches

Samantha Palmeri Contemporary Artist
Samantha Palmeri, Invitation, 2017, oil on canvas, 30 x 36 inches

Samantha Palmeri Contemporary Artist
Samantha Palmeri, Winter painting III, 2016, oil on canvas, 50 x 50 inches

Samantha Palmeri Contemporary Artist
Samantha Palmeri, Winter painting IV, 2016, oil on canvas, 50 x 50 inches

Samantha Palmeri Contemporary Artist
Samantha Palmeri, Save me from my desires, 2015, oil on canvas, 58 x 58 inches











January 7, 2018

February Painting

This looks like a great show. Guest artists were invited to show alongside current members of the gallery. Thanks Barbara Smith Gioia for asking me! Looking forward to seeing these pairings up close. 




Souvenez-vous de cette peinture? I just realized it's funny that I painted it in February 
three years ago, and even labeled it February painting before I titled it "Trepidation".
Now it will be hanging during the month of February. Perfect.



Samantha Palmeri Contemporary Artist
Samantha Palmeri, Trepidation, 2015, oil on canvas, 36 x 36 inches












December 14, 2017

How Much Of The Audience Should I Be Concerned With?

This is a repost of something I wrote back in 2014. It's crazy that I just stumbled across it and it's like I could've written it yesterday! 

Thankfully I feel like the new series of paintings I'm working on is resolving this very issue. I guess we'll just have to wait another 3 years to see if it still applies!

.................................................................................................




laundry meat after a funeral, 2011, 44X44", oil on canvas
caress, 2009, oil on canvas, 54X56"

March 2014

I've always been interested in the figure, but not necessarily in figure painting. I prefer a blurry line between the figurative and abstract. I'd much rather offer a question to the viewer than a declaration. 

Although it's been a while since I made the more definitive transition to pure abstraction, lately I've been looking at some of my older figurative work with a discerning eye.

I notice a big difference in the way people respond to the recognizable versus the unrecognizable. And now that I'm thinking about it, I notice a big difference in the way I'm responding myself. It's like there was more to look at before, more of an essence. 

Most viewers had a much stronger reaction to the work that was more recognizable. I thought it was just that figures and faces were more familiar. It's also hard to experience abstract work when you're spending the whole time trying to 'figure it out' instead of actually looking, which is what people tend to do.
ugly head, 2009, oil on canvas, 54X54"

detail, in like a lion, 2011, oil on canvas, 50X76"
These paintings have a lot in common, but I do feel that there is something almost tangible in the figures that is missing in the abstractions. If I could just get that thing into the abstract paintings...

It's that human connection I've been searching for in all my work, but perhaps it was clearer to a broader audience before. 

I wonder, how much of the audience should I be concerned with? 

What do you think?

the new swimmer, 2009, triptych, 178X50", oil on canvas
skinny, 2012, oil on canvas, 30X50"



































girl with pearl earring, 2008, oil on canvas, 54X56"



snowy november, 2012, oil on canvas, 56X56"


























this side now, 2012, oil on canvas, 72X84"



baby, 2009, oil on canvas, 50X84"

December 4, 2017

CONSUMERISM

I am obsessed with decorating magazines. I admit it. House Beautiful, Elle Decor, Architectural Digest, Domino, Lonny, Dwell, Moon to Moon, etc. etc.
It's kind of a problem because all it does is make me want to go out and buy all the things on the pages, which is the point of course. I know ultimately it's all a farce, but I do love looking at other cultures and the way other people all over the world live. I find it inspiring. Unfortunately it also leads to sweeping generalizations about America and the way we live, the way I live.


Samantha Palmeri art
magic marker on tracing paper, 19 x 24 inches
American culture... where everything has to be brand new, pristine, shiny, and big. We think of ourselves as slightly more moral and decent than the rest of the world, dare I say uncorrupted, at least up until recently, and we like our products to reflect that. When things get used we replace them. Throw out the old and bring in the new. This reinforces our entire way of thinking and living. It's one side or the other. We don't face our problems, we either toss them completely or we rebrand them, clean them up, package and ship them out. Is this really the American ideal? If we stripped away this idea of shiny newness what would that look like?

Well, certainly the answer can't be found on the pages of a glossy magazine, eh! But just look at that old stone cottage, Italian countryside, wild nature climbing all over it, where not one shred of anything is manufactured in China, where maybe the people who live there are as real as the materials... ugh.. I really have to stop subscribing to these things.

Lately I've been searching on the internet for things like how to darn socks and dye old fabrics, and now that it is officially Christmas season this all seems relevant...? I am NOT free from American consumerism by any means. Not all the things on my Christmas list are used/vintage (FYI I just spent a ton of money on a very shiny new kitchen sink), but I also cannot bear to buy one more product from Home Depot or Target. I have no interest in living a life that looks like a sterile hotel room or an ad in a home and garden box store circular. And anyway I can't think of anything warmer and more inviting than objects and interiors and even people that are slightly rumpled and used. Even the body in all its never quite clean, natural pungent irregular messy and imperfect parts.

And that leads me to what I really wanted to tell you about. I know I've gone off on a tangent, but besides my Christmas list, I really have been thinking of all this in relation to my work. If I could embrace that bit of messy nature, of wild rambling vines and the familiarity of the slightly used and rumpled... I'd be very happy.


Samantha Palmeri art
magic marker on tracing paper, 19 x 24 inches
At night while I watch TV I've been making drawings with magic marker on crumpled tracing paper. It feels very liberating. When I started to paint on paper instead of canvas last spring I had this need to not take my materials so seriously. I was feeling pressured with the responsibility of costly canvases and I wanted to not be precious with anything. I want to be free and unencumbered with my materials but also I want to make work that is more natural, less laborious and ultimately more accessible for the viewer. Although I've been going back and forth between canvas and paper, I'm approaching it differently. Less preciousness, less earnestness, less pressure, more natural, more immediate, more personal, more accessible. Nature is a wild beautiful miry mess and I'd like to embrace that, at least in my work if I can.

... off on a tangent or not, I'm planning to give everyone jarred peaches for Christmas this year, tied with a used ribbon and a handmade paper card... we'll see how well that goes over.


Happy Season to you all!
Happy Making, and thinking, and being!


September 26, 2017

WHY DO WE FOLLOW RULES?

I make up a lot of rules for myself. Rules that may or may not actually exist, that I may or may not have invented all for myself. And I follow them, maybe out of tradition or convention or fear or doubt or bad habit or laziness, or maybe because it's what I see other people doing so I think this must be how things are done. Rules that seem perfectly logical and reasonable.

But it's like WHY?? Why am I following all these rules that I may or may not have had anything to do with and that maybe have nothing to do with me.

Painting is a very traditional medium. It's been around for thousands of years now and has accumulated a VERY long list of rules. So many rules that even breaking traditional painting rules has become a rule.

I think I've been very conventional in my thinking about my work. For the most part I'm a stretched canvas, paint brush and palette of oil paint and medium kind of painter. And that's been fine except that all of a sudden it's not!

Samantha Palmeri Contemporary Artist
Hangover painting, 2017, acrylic and oil on cardboard


I've been very precious with these things and it's holding me back. Following these painting rules whether self imposed or not, is holding me back. It's created four walls around me that I keep banging up against. I want to feel free, like there are no rules at all, like I've just discovered painting for the first time, like a child. I especially want to feel like if something's not working I'm not forcing myself to try to gloss over it to make it better. Working through painting issues and the problems we create on canvas is all very well, sometimes even the whole point, but trying to make it work just because it's already there and because I've already spent so much time on it will never work! The only rule really should be, if you know in your gut it's not working destroy it and start over. But I also have a rule about time... I think I consider some paintings finished when they're definitely not because I feel like I've spent ample time with them. Or the opposite, where I keep working on something that may already be finished, because I feel like I've invested so much money and energy in the materials and preparation it can't possibly be done after a few hours of work. These are ridiculous self imposed rules that are clouding my judgement.

Being precious with your work gets you nowhere. I need to get rid of this way of thinking and be free to get at the thing I'm supposed to be getting at! I have no idea exactly how to do that, but recognizing the problem is a good first step!